Reconnaissance II

Street Photography

White Lodge
Reconnaissance II. Trying a monochromatic effect of bluish-white in this photo. The Bayanihan Lodge is just one among many American influenced structure in Baguio City. This city is a melting pot of cultures. 05/23/18

Taken at noon, another shot for our series of the Bayanihan Lodge. An American influenced architecture in Baguio City.

Jeepneys and local people and transportation crossed in front of this structure, giving a the multi-cultural scene in this part of the city.

 

The Bayanihan Lodge saga…
Advertisements

Closing

Street Night Photography

_DSC9586 (3)
The Closing. Kayang Hilltop, Baguio City. 8;30pm

Kayang-Hilltop street at Baguio City, during the closing of Panagbenga, displays the fireworks scene from Burnham Park. This hill connects the market and the different jeepney terminals, surrounded with old fashioned establishment converted to business hub.

At day you would see regular market activities. Wonder what the street turns into at night?

 

_DSC9586 (4)
Red Light. The market goes on all day; it closes at night but the business continues…

 

Treasured Ruins

Street Photography

DSC_4605
Treasured Ruins.  Baguio City, Philippines. Claudio-Carantes Street

We treasure what we do not want to get ruined. This is how creative the people are in this city. Even ruins can turn into treasures.

This ruin used to stand in this busy street which brings tourists to famous Baguio destinations.

Now, this ruin will now only be treasured in this photograph.

Crossing Corners

Street Photography

_DSC9534
Crossing Corners. Baguio City (02/22/2018; 6:00pm)

One of the busiest roads in the city where people cross from all corners of this intersection, and scurrying vehicles meet head to tail.

The Bayanihan Lodge in Baguio – an old architectural styled building found across Burnham Park along Shanum Street in Baguio.

This treasured architecture faces property concerns with the local government’s aim to develop the city. The old lodge houses the city’s famous’ Ukay-Ukay (bargain market for clothes).

 

“Sustainable Tourism” (Photo Story)

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Sustainable Tourism: An Invitation to Participate

12771772_10206241825993738_2940916267679352571_o
“Alay sa Kalikasan”. (A Service to Nature). These volunteers stayed at the end of the parade. No trace of mess and trash were left on the streets after everyone has gone.

The Street Dance Parade and the Flower Float Parade mark the height of the celebration during Panagbenga Festival in Baguio City inviting tourists or visitors to keep coming back in this town.

Tourism treats local social and economic entrepreneurs with guests from different places to patronize products and services offered by the local people. Sustaining the flow of trade and other activities which help promote home-based potentials and opportunities.

One of the threats of tourism however is pollution to the environment because of neglect to practice keeping the surroundings clean during festivities.

“Alay sa Kalikasan” (A Service to Nature). Holding broomsticks and dustpans, and a banner not to adorn their own group, and joining the parade not to perform but to serve nature by keeping the tail of the performers and street dancers out of trash and mess from the paraders; these are local volunteers from the community committed to give service.

Reminding everyone who participate in the parades- that each one can do their own simple share of awareness in keeping the environment clean. One may not have to bring her own broomstick; it is enough just to carry a selfie-stick and then not leaving any trash behind but properly practice throwing them in the right place.

So everybody may always receive this warm invitation as they go, “Thank you for visiting! Please come again!”

 

Connecting Fragments *

Grassroots’ Advocate is celebrating their first post.

“Fragmented. Diverse. Co-existing. These are three words I would describe my country. Despite fragments which need to connect, we persist to co-exist and break these barriers.”

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Grassroots' Advocate

Fragmented.
This is how I remember my first lesson about the Philippines when I was a first grader. The first lesson is to describe a picture of small fragments of islands and islets being grouped under what are called Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.

Diverse.
Coming to know of the country, which I have to be proud of, is home for a more than a thousand of species many of which are endemic to the country’s abounding wealth and beauty of various forms of natural resources.
These descriptions show how vast are the forms of life living in the Philippines, not only those we can find in nature but most especially are the people in-charge of these possessions as a nation.

Baguio, Benguet has been my home since I started college. I am not a native of Benguet or in any part of the Cordillera, but I had a chance to…

View original post 1,026 more words

THE STREET RUNNER: She is running for her life….

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

This is a story of  a woman who has to face the battle against authorities on the streets in the locality of Baguio city, Philippines. This is her story kept from the past, and her story still represents those who are like her today, who have to keep running to save themselves and their families’ living.

“I can. I will run as long as I still can. I will endure running for my family, so that they will have something to eat, for them to live“, said 61 years old Mary Angfosen, a native of Mt. Province, Philippines.

From her hometown Manang Mary came to live in Baguio city as a sidewalk vendor. She had to sell her vegetables where many people would pass by her and see her basket of vegetables. There will be a greater chance that the goods she was selling would be sold if she would roam around the streets.

The vegetables looked good. It was in the late afternoon and the crops displayed on her tray were still fresh. She sells pechay (green chard),  still vivid-green and leafy bundled together and have no signs of being withered. The beans and the peas were looking crisp and spotless on their surface that was obvious on the beaming late afternoon sunlight.

Pechay, beans… sangapulo lang, tumbok ading (Pechay, beans, only for ten pesos per bundle)”, invited Manang Mary to the people passing her at one corner of the side-walk in Mabini street. This has been her spot every afternoon. “ We will run if there are the POSD’s. We need to transfer from one place to another everyday”, she shared.

With her basket of oranges, “Manang” has to master the skill of running while carrying kilos of fruits each day. As she tries to escape the “P-O-S-Ds” (Public Order and Safety Division officials) roaming in the city streets, it is the only way for her to make sure she sells all her goods to sustain her family.

The POSD stands for Public Order and Safety Division officers of Baguio city who were in-charge of keeping the streets free from sidewalk vendors; For they were believed to cause the garbage issue in the city. Manang Mary and the vendors like her are affected by the policy of the city government, which started several years ago to clear all sidewalks from vendors.

 “We rented a stall at Hilltop Block 4, but there were only few people who go there so only few buy our goods. That is why we have to go here where the crowd is located to sell everything we had”, according to manang Mary. From Hangar market she will get 10 kilos of pechay, 5 kilos of beans, and 3 kilos of peas. According to her they have to sell all the vegetables joining a group of vendors who helps out each other in selling.

From the main stall where they get the vegetables from the businessman who will give them 1000 pesos as a credit, they have to return it with 10 percent interest. To do this, manang Mary said that there is someone who will collect 100 pesos from them every day. Aside from the vegetables she was also selling fruits if it is in season.

She had been selling vegetables as a living since she came to Baguio. “This is what I have been used to doing for living” she said. At 61, manang Mary cannot tell exactly when she started selling.

She had been in Baguio for forty years where she had joined her relatives at Pinsao. She came from Barrio Maligkong in Mt. Province and then migrated to Baguio after she got married. She and her husband chose to live here because they find it difficult to get a good source of income in the province.

Manang Mary finished schooling until the third grade level. Both of her parents are native of Bontoc and ever since she was young, her parents were already working as farm laborers or tenants. They had no personal piece of land owned in their province. After she left school, she already engaged in work by helping her parents farm and sometimes took care of pigs.

“We are the poorest of the poor”, she  exclaimed remembering how life was at the province.

11146388_10204457192419014_6584777736572577207_o.jpg
Photo by GrassrootsAdvocate

For manang Mary at the early age she has to help her parents work. If they would not find an opportunity to labor at a farm they would not have food to eat. Manang Mary said that as long as you have something to plant and harvest you will not go hungry. Their family had to work really hard.

Manang Mary married a man from Bontoc. Her husband, 57 y/old has been working as a laborer while selling has been her form of livelihood. She has seven children, five male and two female. Now, she already has five grandchildren. Manang Mary has been old enough for her not to remember some details like the birthdays of her children. According to her, the eldest of her children was born on 1975, her youngest was born on 1992. Two of her children were already married and raising a family of their own. They still join her at their home in Pinsao. Her youngest was able to study college and took up Education.

Her son, the second of her children, took Agriculture in a State University. According to manang Mary, that is what her son wanted to do. Farming has been what her son ever known to do. Unfortunately, her son was not able to continue his studies. She had admitted that they do not have enough finances to support his studying. Instead, her son went to La Union where there was an opportunity to work as a farmer.

There was a time that her other son applied for a job that is provided by the government. Her son took the exam but he was not employed.  “There was politicking” she inferred. She wished that the government would provide jobs for the people who are in line with their skills.

“Unfair,” manang Mary shared her sentiments. She said that when people apply for job they would not get employed.

At 61 she still dreams but not for herself. She dreams for her family. “I only wanted all my children to finish their studies and earn a degree, after that, I can die.” She is happy and satisfied with her selling vegetables. There is no other job that she would want to do. She have also no regrets about being a vendor.

She only wanted to make sure that her family would always have food to eat. “I am happy. I would sell so that I am sure my family would have always something to eat. That is my happiness.”

Everyday that manang Mary would work on the streets, she would not mind the POSD patrolling. “I only need to run,” she said. She has not yet experienced being caught and the hardest challenge in her work is being old.

When the POSD caught someone, the vendors will try to protect their products. “Some of them would try to confiscate using force even if the vendor is an elderly. Our backs as old people would always ache and we can feel getting weaker each time passes by”, she explained.

At 61 Manang Mary is still running. She can and she will. She is running for her family. She runs for her living, so she can still provide for her family.

*This Feature Story is originally a written output for DevC110 course. (copyright 2013)