Re-‘Sili’-ence

Street Night Photography

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Re’sili’ence. I love this photo for its contrasting element. Red-hot chilli peppers, natively known as “siling lauyo” is a staple among Filipino dining tales. (Nikon3100.f5/6.ISO400.1/2sec.)

Re-sili-ence. Every year, when the “ber” months approach, supplies in the country, big or small, no matter what kind or type, their costs continue to change.

The siling labuyo, this small, but loved-by-all commodity shook every pinoy foodie’s attention by the hike in its price.

While inflation causes heightened concerns among Filipinos, there are a lot of factors which affects increase among prices. The Philippines is vulnerable to threats caused by Economic, political, social, and natural disturbances like weather and other disasters.

There is a great call for resilience among the people. One of the suggested innovation every household can do is the planting of mini vegetation or “plant on pots” or plant boxes in the people’s backyard.The real concerns which flood Filipino consciousness is that planting is only realized among farming communities. People in the urban areas find it hard to visualize this practice especially in houses which mostly built with no vegetative space or soils around their area.

More than the ways on how-to’s in solving problems within different aspects in the community, being “innovative” is one attitude common among Filipinos of every generation that has to be revived and relived. Once every pinoy get to realize her/his true value and capability, true resilience would be a reality and not just a projection, propaganda or policy.

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Habakkuk: Torrents of hope

Habakkuk : A photo story

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Hope is not only seen on canvas of rainbows and green leaves and clear skies.

There is hope found waiting in the presence of the rain. Hope is when we halt colorful words, and listen to silence. A whisper of the wind is enough for the day.

When each soul does not need a word to speak, and every inch of an unsettled breath is enough to tell, “I’ll be closer, it will be fine, even not today, I know someday…” hope comes to life and reality is better than a picture or a poetry.

The face of calamity patiently waits in the presence of torrents and thunders; drought and death; necessities and uncertainties.

_DSC1217 copyManang “Victoria” (right side), not her real name, is one of the evacuees after Ompong swept their properties in Itogon, Benguet. More than 100 families found shelter in Pacalso Elementary School  (source: AMPHS volunteers). Though each person in the evacuation site holds many different background and personal stories, she represents those who are like her, who will leave the center and will find another home outside Itogon. The Itogon and Benguet Province Local Government Unit has ordered that the standard number of days for evacuation centers is 5-7 days maximum.

The barangays or communities which were impaired by the landslide is still too dangerous to welcome back people who once and always lived there. The members and the families, including “Manang Victoria”, of Ucab, Balatoc and other isolated areas in Itogon, and then Benguet, will have to find home among relatives, or other dwelling places in near and even farther region. Knowing someday, Manang Victoria hopes that she’ll be able to go back to the place she always calls her “home.”

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#evacuation stories
#Ompong Rehabilitation
#Itogon Rehabilitation

 

 

 

Signs: A Retrospect

Luna Photography

“Signs”: Retrospect

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Red. A Retrospect of The Blood Moon of February 2018.

Last February, the first lunar eclipse for this year, 2018, occurred. Following yet another lunar eclipse for this month at this day, my lenses are on watch.

It’s cloudy here tonight in the Philippines, hoping to capture the moon’s retrograde this July 27th-28th.

 

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“Pula”. Means red, taken last February 2018. Baguio City, PH. original photo by (c) Grassrootsadvocate.

 

Stay tuned to see if I could take a shot.

Reconnaissance II

Street Photography

White Lodge
Reconnaissance II. Trying a monochromatic effect of bluish-white in this photo. The Bayanihan Lodge is just one among many American influenced structure in Baguio City. This city is a melting pot of cultures. 05/23/18

Taken at noon, another shot for our series of the Bayanihan Lodge. An American influenced architecture in Baguio City.

Jeepneys and local people and transportation crossed in front of this structure, giving a the multi-cultural scene in this part of the city.

 

The Bayanihan Lodge saga…

Crossing Contrasts

Street Photography

Baguio City Architectures- The Bayanihan Lodge

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The Bayanihan Lodge in Baguio City also one of the the Ukay-Ukay Centers in the city. April 13,2018. Photo by Grassroots’ Advocate

 

This structure has been a favorite subject for our street photography. This one was taken at day time. More of the Bayanihan Lodge (check this one taken at late noon- Crossing Corners) in our future posts for Grassroots’ Photography. Thanks for continuous support and follow to our page!

 

The Crescent Revelation: “Eid al-Fitr” (Breaking of the festival of the fast)

Photo Story

The Crescent Revelation: “Eid al-Fitr” (Breaking of the festival of the fast)

Mosque, Baguio city, Campo Filipino
Crescent Moon on the Mosque. The crescent moon marks the peak of the mosque, the traditional and holy place for worship among the Muslims.  The crescent moon also marks the beginning of the Ramadan; 1400 years ago, this was the month where the first verses of the Quran were revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. Fasting is observed during this month as part of the five pillars of the Islam faith.

 

Eid al-Fitr, the breaking of the festival of the fast among the Muslim communities around the world, is observed on the 14th- 16th of June, this year.

For the Muslim community in the Philippines, today ends their fasting for this month of Ramadan. One of the growing population of Muslims is found here in Baguio City.

With the Maranaos which formed most Muslim families in this area, the Mosque built at Campo Filipino establishes their presence to be visible in the Baguio population.

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Crescent. 1400 years ago the Prophet Muhammad of the Muslims, received the first verses for the holy book, Quran. This is a significant and historical day for the Muslims where they celebrate the month of Ramadan. The first visibility of the crescent moon for this month, as observed from the Muslim Lunar calendar, would begin the season of their fast.

The crescent moon found on the peak of a Mosque reveals a core truth in the Islam faith. The Ramadan, for the Muslims, is the month where the first verses of the Quran, their holy book, were given to the prophet Muhammad. Thus where all their faith and Muslim practices begin. The day the new crescent moon would be visible to the naked eye on the month of Ramadan, signals the beginning of the fasting in their community.

Eid al-Fitr is the breaking of the fasting for Ramadan. As this season ends, living continues for the Maranao Muslims here in Baguio City and nearby provinces with their presence visible to the activities in the cities’ business districts.

Displaced from their first home in Mindanao, most of them still hopes that they could come back to their fields, continue raising their living and sustaining their families from their own land.

 

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Mosque. The first Mosque built in the northern part of the Philippines is found at barangay Campo Filipino in Baguio City. The Maranaos make up most of the Muslim population in Baguio City. One of their established territory is in this barangay.